un Projects is based on the unceded sovereign land and waters of the Wurundjeri and Boon Wurrung people of the Kulin Nation; we pay our respects to their Elders, past, present and emerging.
un Projects

Andrea Eckersley and Susan Jacobs

Wizard Rolling

Wizard Rolling is a collaborative work between Andrea Eckersley and Susan Jacobs, combining Jacobs’ material investigation into the melting point of gallium with narration from excerpts of Eckersley’s article The artist as transcendental empiricist (featuring discussion of artworks by Jacobs and Canadian artist Elizabeth Zvonar) in un Magazine 10.1 magazine. Andrea Eckersley is an artist […]

Isadora Vaughan

Monster soup, after William Heath 2016; Monster soup, further detail (growing animals) 2016; Monster soup, further detail (growing indigo) 2016

Sophia Dacy-Cole

Interview With Artist and Theorist Erin Manning

Sophia Dacy-Cole is an MFA candidate at Monash University. Her research concerns the co-mingling of process philosophy, contemporary art and grassroots activism. This is the full interview with Sophia and artist and theorist Erin Manning on her keynote For a Pragmatics of the Useless at the Transversal Matters conference, Victorian College of the Arts, Melbourne, […]

Tessa Zettel

Collective objects of anxiety: Things encountered and enacted in Paris, Autumn 2015

It’s early October and I’ve come to Bétonsalon Centre for Art and Research for the opening of Co-Workers: Beyond Disaster. Three months since arriving in Paris, disaster is already decidedly in the air. The United Nations COP21 climate change talks (expected by most to be its own car crash of performative political inaction) are not […]

Vincent Silk

Never Not Working – Interview With Despo Debby of Debby Doesn’t Do It For Free, 2016

Vincent Silk is a writer. His work has appeared in Seizure, Archer, Going Down Swinging, MIX NYC, Slit, Alien She, and elsewhere.  Here Vincent interviews Despo Debby from the Australian sex worker art collective Debby Doesn’t Do It For Free about visual art and performance through collective and anonymous, art-making and current political issues in […]

Chris Griffiths

Sharing one cup

We don’t create our song and dance like the way a rock ’n’ roll muso creates theirs. Our song and dance are given to us in two ways. They come from family, like an inheritance we become custodians for. And they come fresh in our dreams from spirits and Country. You know when you wake […]

Mashara Wachjudy

‘Recollect and Reconnect’ and ‘Djaraba’s Nura’

Mashara Wachjudy is a Sydney-based emerging artist currently undertaking a Bachelor of Fine Arts and a Bachelor of Arts at UNSW/Art & Design. Wachjudy’s work attempts to focus predominantly on the intricacies of cultural identity and belonging through the complex and interwoven relationships between place, time and culture. Wachjudy’s debut solo exhibition, Outside Inside, was […]

Anatol Pitt

Material co-existence: beyond materiality and agency

Kirsten Pieroth’s boiled and bottled copies of The New York Times, in her Conservation Piece (2010) in The Biography of Things, embody this material and relational perspective. The viewer is presented with a deconstructed language through physical reorganisation of the newspaper. Laid out like a school science experiment, the social and symbolic power of The […]

Dylan Rainforth

How Aborigines Invented the Idea of Object-Oriented Ontology

[^1] There was a sense of urgency to communicate with the objects before our time was up. I had to let them know we are still out here, waiting for them, remembering them; that they weren’t forgotten. — Julie Gough, Trawlwoolway artist, 2015.[^2] The title of Soviet writer Sergei Tretyakov’s 1929 essay ‘The Biography of […]

Sarah Rodigari

Fashioning radical politics

The conversation that follows is woven together from a series of emails and Skypes between Ariel Goldberg and myself. Goldberg’s first book of poetry The Photographer was recently published by Roof Books, New York. They are also curate Friday Nights at the Poetry Project in New York City. Our discussion centres on the forthcoming publication […]

Brighid Fitzgerald & Tash Madden

Untitled

Fibres from one woollen blanket found on tram stop outside Melbourne Central Station. “Warrnambool 1965” written on tag. Packaging from one battery operated lint shaver from Daiso. Rice paper from Daiso (for bonding paper fibres together). Butcher’s paper from Dean’s Art, rolled into an A4 piece of scrap paper that lists woodwind instruments (also included). […]

Ioana Gordon-Smith

Terms of Convenience

In Aotearoa New Zealand ‘Pacific art’ as a descriptor is taken for granted. As a curator—New Zealand–born with Sāmoan and English heritage—the question of labelling frequently comes up for me. In addition to being described as a ‘Pacific art curator’, I’m also placed in positions where I too need to contextualise and situate artists’ practices, […]

Pip Wallis, Aodhan Madden & Beth Caird

Editorial

Some of these words were written while in the house of A.L Steiner, an artist whose practice is abundant with intersecting threads, beginning with her strong, wide lesbian and queer community and weaving outward into environmental activism and racial politics. At her current exhibition in Los Angeles Come & Go, one can request to view […]

Aodhan Madden

Making batteries: conversation with the Karrabing Film Collective

Drawing from questions written with Adelle Mills and Pip Wallis, I met a few members of the Karrabing Film Collective (Linda Yarrowin, Rex Edmunds, Natasha Lewis, Gavin Bianamu, Elizabeth Povinelli and their friend, Susan Edmunds) during their time in Melbourne, in August. The collective were showing two short films at the Melbourne International Film Festival: […]

Rosie Isaac

Script for a silent choral reading: A disagreement between Truth and Security

Beth Caird

Interview with Patrick Staff

BETH CAIRD: Could you please introduce your practice to us, a largely new Australian audience, in the lead up to your show at the Institute of Modern Art (IMA) in Brisbane? PATRICK STAFF: I suppose I am preoccupied at the moment with thinking about how particular bodies are presented, produced, represented and assessed. I am […]

Evangeline Graham

Sentience Applied, or How to butcher cattle

Lauren Burrow

When I Was Ten I Named My Puppy Girl God Aphrodite The Dog Of Love

Cinnamon Templeton

The land of the monster

identity politics One of the most important things that identity politics has taught us is that the distinction between being and doing is fraught. To think you have to perform an action. To perform an action you have to discard frivolity and set yourself on solid ground. Discourses of violence are inextricable from the subjects […]

Jonathan P. Watts with Adam Linder

S, s, s, s sommme p, p,p,p,proxim, im, im, ity

Eva Birch

Selfish takes two

I am selfish and so is everyone else under capitalism who can afford an iPhone. Men like to talk about surveillance as if it is the state. Women take photos of themselves. A famous woman selling herself is the archetype of us all. Selfish, Kim Kardashian West’s book of selfies taken over her lifetime, induces […]

Oliva Koh

Dear J

Dear J,[^1] As you have made note, decomposition occurs quickly in the tropics. Notably, it is a common desire amongst those concerned that your body not touch the ground throughout these procedures (Skeat, Evans). With this in mind we press on. After your initial demise the first expressions of grief are emitted (Snouk Hujronje). They […]

Holly Chlids

Lost Mines

Georgia Robenstone

How not to be seen

Choreographer Anouk van Dijk investigates the possibilities afforded by the blind spot in a piece titled Depth of Field, presented by Chunky Move, which took place in the ACCA forecourt over a series of evenings in March, 2015.[^9] Ostensibly, the performance consists of Chunky Move dancers James Vu Anh Pham, Tara Jade Samaya and Niharika […]

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